[:en]Making the goggles for the Wrench Cosplay[:de]LED Brille für das Wrench Cosplay[:]

[:en]I had the amazing opportunity to help Skunk & Weasel Cosplay with one of their projects and make the led goggles/glasses for their Wrench Cosplay. Both of them are know for their high quality Cosplays and you should totally check them out on Facebook. (But don’t forget to come back here!)

Take a look at the finished mask:

Today I had a shooting and fantastic time with @eosandy_ and @eri_froostloops and @weaselcos #ubisoft #wrench #iamdedsec #watchdogs #commission #sony #horizonzerodawn #freckles #ps4 #emojis #guerrillagames

A photo posted by SKUNK (@msskunk) on Aug 5, 2016 at 12:27pm PDT

So, Wrench is a new character from Watchdogs 2 and prominently known for his mask which has LED glasses, that displays his mood via emotes. Since I am a Techie, I offered to help with the LED part, which was a lot of fun and I hope this guide will help others to build there own version. If you have any questions, comments or you need help with your projects, use the comment section below or drop me a line at info@enjinia.de
For now take a look at the official cosplay guide:

Our Wrench Cosplay Reference Guide is available NOW! >> https://t.co/kuEzHc8FQ8 #WatchDogs2 pic.twitter.com/dNcVdUfn4d

— Watch Dogs (@watchdogsgame) July 12, 2016

Check out those displays! Look at that resolution and and pixel density. People have made LED glasses before, but usually with low resolution matrices, like 8×8 or so. Something like that would be okay….ish, but I thought to myself, that I would have to kick it up a notch for Skunk & Weasel. Something that is just ‘okay’, would not be enough.

If you want to try this at home, please note that I did some really horrible things to some really nice Adafruit merchandise. These hacks may damage the electronics, even if performed correctly and you might even accidentally damage your USB Port(s), if you follow this guide. I take no responsibility for any damages that may be caused by following these instructions.
You have been warned.

Features:
16 x 16 pixels per eye
External power supply – should last for longer then 10 hours.
Remote Control for the emotes – single quick push, emote flashes up. Longer press, emote is displayed until another button is pressed.

Some of the materials used in this project:

(Note: these are affiliate links. I get a tiny amount of money if you use them to buy stuff. This comes at no additional costs to you, but helps me to break even on my server costs and additional spending on the projects I want to present here)

Adafruit 0.8″ 8×16 LED Matrix FeatherWing Display Kit – White
Anker Astro E1 5200mAh Mini Externer Akku Power Bank USB Ladegerät mit PowerIQ für iPhone 6s, 6, 6s Plus, Galaxy S6 S5 und weitere (Schwarz)
Aukru HC-05 Wireless-Bluetooth-Host Serial-Transceiver-Modul Slave und Master RS232 mit 6 set kabel für Arduino
Tinksky HC-06 Bluetooth RF-Transceiver-Modul drahtlose serielle 4 Pins für Arduino (zufällige Kabelfarbe)
Andux Zone Jagd Airsoft X400 Wind Staubschutz Tactical Schutzbrille-Motorrad Brille GL-04 (clear)
Nano V3.0 Modul mit ATmega328P, CH340G, 5V Board, 16MHz, Arduino kompatibel
The goggles
I used cheap recreational goggles for this project and replaced the clear plastic visor with some perforated aluminium sheet metal, so that the LED glasses can be hidden behind it. When you buy your sheet metal, get some with waaaaay bigger holes. You basically want this to be a mesh, so very little light is lost. The ones I bought were to small and I ended up drilling a bazillion holes by hand, while constantly praying not to fuck it up.

The housing is actually very flexible, almost like hard rubber

Thickness: 0,8 mm, holes 2 mm, spaced 3,5 mm apart (center to center). The holes where widened to 2,8 mm later on

The visor comes off very easily and I used it as a guide to cut the sheet metal.

Wrench Cosplay cutting the visor

I used an angle grinder to cut the sheet metal. Any other rotary tool with a grinding wheel should work too. I prefer grinding, since it makes very clean cuts and wont leave any tooling marks. You only need to file away the burrs and then you are good to go.

Wrench Cosplay finish

As I mentioned, I had to widen the holes by hand, which worked out better then I expected. The holes were originally 2 mm in diameter, spaced 3,5 mm apart (measured center to center) and were drilled out to 2,8 mm. If you have to do this, I suggest to not drill the edges. Nobody will notice this or even care and it might be a good idea to have sturdier edges. Drilling also leaves some nasty burrs, which need to be removed. Remember, this is a mask and will be worn on the eyes, you DO NOT WANT metal shavings in your eyes. Be thorough!

In any case, you need to use some sandpaper on this and rough it up, because we are about to paint it black.

Wrench Cosplay Visor drilled

Not to bad right? I used a simple acrylic paint from the hardware store and a brush, but painting isn’t really my thing. The pros among you may get better results with spray paint or airbrush or something I haven’t even thought about. I was playing with the idea of getting it anodized by a friend, but there wasn’t enough time and I was worried, that any acid wash used in the process might eat away to much of the thin structures.

Wrench Cosplay goggles painted

Electronics:
Enter the (LED) MATRIX
After consulting google for a little bit, the KWM-20882XWB-Y seems to be the LED matrix with the highest available resolution, condensing an 8×8 LED array down into a square of 2 x 2 cm. Also, it has white LEDs! Let me tell you, there aren’t that many white LED matrices to be found…. After making a small cardboard mock-up, I figured that 4 of these for each eye is all that would fit into the mask and would provide sufficient resolution for all the Emotes. That would be astonishing 16 x 16 LED’s per eye! Most LED glasses have only a resolution of 8 x 8 pixels.

Wrench Cosplay KWM-20882XWB-Y LED Matrix

Luckily, there are modules available by Adafruit which include a controller (HT16K33). they can control up to 2 matrices and handle all the current limiting and complex multiplexing of the LEDs. This makes it easier to control the insane amount of LEDs with as little effort as possible. This is not (just) lazyness but it also makes the result less error prone. Since this guide is aimed at novices, I wont go into much detail about the electronics, but you should still be able to hook everything up. An in-depth article about the modules and the software will be written in the future, if demand is high enough.

Wrench Cosplay Adafruit 8×16 LED Matrix FeatherWing

For our purposes, the modules are a little bit to wide and leave an unacceptable gap in the middle. But as you can already guess from the picture, I solved this by filing away the excess material. A majority of the connectors holes on both sides isn’t used anyway and serve no purpose.

Wrench Cosplay two Adafruit 8×16 LED Matrix FeatherWing gap

So I filed the edges of the PCBs, until they weren’t protruding anymore and where on level with the LED matrices.

Wrench Cosplay Adafruit 8×16 LED Matrix FeatherWing filing

See? No more gap!

Wrench Cosplay Adafruit 8×16 LED Matrix FeatherWing no gap

As I said before, most of the pins aren’t used by the module anyway and it its totally save to solder the two boards together, for more stability. These ‘double-modules” need to be wired, in order to work properly. Solder as indicated in the picture. Note, that the top connections ABSOLUTELY NEED to be connected like this, at the bottom side of those resistors (the black rectangles, marked 1002). The wiring on the top is for the I2C data lines, that the boards use to communicate and the bottom ones are for the power supply. According to the pinout, red is +5V, green is ground (GND), beige is SDA and turquoise is SCL (you don’t need to know what this means, but you need to know which is which later, when you hook the display up to the Arduino).

Sidenote: I connect the display to 5 V, although the modules are designed to work with 3,3 V from a feather board. As far as I can tell, the controller chips are designed to work with up to 5 V anyway and seem to limit the LED current automatically. I can’t find a clear statement about the current limiting in the HT16K33 datasheet, but it works perfectly, so I didn’t ask any questions.

Wrench Cosplay two Adafruit 8×16 LED Matrix FeatherWing solderd together solder markings corrected

Your result should look somewhat like this, minus the aluminium strip. That comes later. You also nee to connect booth ‘eyes’ with each other. Just solder SCL to SCL, SDA to SDA, 5V to 5V and so on and you are good to go. You could basically hook this up to any Arduino and play around with it (errh…I mean make sure that it works…).
Wrench Cosplay two Adafruit 8×16 LED Matrix FeatherWing I2C soldered

By coincidence, the mounting holes of the modules align perfectly with the sheet metal. So I cut out a strip of sheet metal with a nibbler (a type of metal work scissors). Sometimes, the most important thing when planning a project, is to have dumb luck. I bend the metal strip into shape and screwed the modules on it, with some M2 screws, which where cut to length and then filed, in order to remove burrs and tool marks. Looks a lot more like glasses already!

I used an Arduino Nano to control both displays. You could also use an Arduino Pro Mini, which would be smaller but in this case I wanted to use something that could be programmed again in the field by a layman. You know, just in case something goes wrong, a layman could plug this to a computer and I could reflash everything by remote connection. With the Pro Mini, they would need a programming dongle and I would also need to explain to a layman how to connect that to the goggles and only God knows, if connecting a programmer later would be even possible at all. Keep in mind that this would also most likely be in a situation where everything broke and they needed it in working order in 5 minutes. So no, I didn’t take any chances.

At any rate, I took the Arduino and connected it to the display. Hooking up GND to GND, 5V to Vin (NOTE: I used a 5V power supply, so this works and doesn’t stress the voltage regulator on the Arduino. Your setup may be different.) and of course SDA to A4 and SCL to A5 (Note: Only applicable for the Arduino Nano, consult the pinout description of your board, if you use something else). I don’t have a picture of that, but you can see something in my full systems check. This is also how I did most of my software testing.

Wrench Cosplay System test

After confirming that everything works, I hot glued the Display into the goggles at the center and at the edges. It is actually a very tight fit already, so I didn’t want to mess everything up with big globs of hot glue. I might have to disassemble everything later and using huge amounts of glue would just get in the way.

Wrench Cosplay hot glued

The Bluetooth modules
Connecting the HC-05 to the HC-06 Module is a little bit involved if you haven’t worked with an Arduino before and so far I haven’t managed to write a newbie friendly guide for it. Please look here for more details: https://www.martyncurrey.com/connecting-2-arduinos-by-bluetooth-using-a-hc-05-and-a-hc-06-pair-bind-and-link/

I will update this post with some additional info, as soon as I can put it together.

The Remote
Wrench Cosplay remote test
As you can see, the buttons are different sizes, because they come from different batches/manufacturers. The technical reason for this is, that I am a moron and I suck at keeping inventory.

The LED glasses are controlled by remote via Bluetooth. You could use a commercially available keypad, put there are none that have more then 16 keys (without having significantly more then 16 keys) and we want(?) to have all of the 17 Emotes from the official cosplay guide. So I soldered my own, which turned out to be smaller anyway. Originally I planed to have this hidden inside a spike wristband, but I soon realized that it was getting to big and was in danger of turning out like this:

ZYPAD wrist wearable computer from Arcom Control Systems
I think the wristband remote could still be done, if I could come up with a clever button scheme, in order to reduce buttons and save space.

So, a simple remote it is. I soldered small push buttons into a grid on a piece of perf board, with 4 columns and 5 rows, the last row has just one button. I apologize for not having a clearer picture and diagram, it will be provided later, when I have more time.

Wrench Cosplay Keypad matrix

The 5 row are connected to pin 2,3,4,5 and 6 of another Arduino Nano and the columns to 7,8,9 and 10. The button number ‘1’ should be connected to row 2 and column 10. If you don’t care which button is which, then this doesn’t matter. Finally, the HC-05 Serial to Bluetooth module is used to connect to the goggles. Just wire TX to pin 11 and RX to Pin 12 and you are good to go. I soldered everything onto the perf board and gave it a USB plug, so that the remote could be powered by a powerbank. I used another Anker Astro E1 5200mAh, which is totally overpowered, but this way there is an emergency spare for the goggles. The powerbank is attached to the remote with a strip of double sided velcro.

Software:
You can find the firmware for the remote and the goggles here:

https://github.com/madgyver/Wrench-Cosplay-Remote
https://github.com/madgyver/Wrench-Cosplay-Goggles
If you have have written programs in C oder C++ before, you will see that I just modified some example projects and that the code is pretty trivial. I choose to write simple, easy to read code over elegant solutions, so that everyone can give it a try, without breaking everything.

So that’s basically it. I hope you enjoyed the guide and that you will have an opportunity to see it live at Gamescom 2016. If you have questions please use the comment section below.[:de]Ich hatte die einmalige Gelegenheit, Skunk & Weasel Cosplay bei einem ihrer Projekte zu helfen und die LED-Brille für ihr Wrench Cosplay anzufertigen. Beide sind für ihre hochwertigen Cosplays bekannt und ihr solltet unbedingt mal auf deren Facebookseite mal vorbeischauen. (Aber vergesst nicht wieder hierher zurück zu kommen!)

Schauen wir uns erstmal die fertige Maske an:

Today I had a shooting and fantastic time with @eosandy_ and @eri_froostloops and @weaselcos #ubisoft #wrench #iamdedsec #watchdogs #commission #sony #horizonzerodawn #freckles #ps4 #emojis #guerrillagames

A photo posted by SKUNK (@msskunk) on Aug 5, 2016 at 12:27pm PDT

Also, Wrench ist ein neuer Character aus Watch Dogs 2 und ist jetzt schon für seine Maske bekannt, die LED-Displays enthält, welche seinen Gemütszustand über Emotes anzeigen. Da ich eine Techie bin, habe ich angeboten bei der technischen Realisierung der Maske zu helfen, was auch jede Menge Spaß gemacht hat und ich hoffe das dieser Guide anderen helfen kann, ihre eigene Version zu bauen. Falls ihr Fragen oder Kommentare habt, oder Hilfe bei einem Projekt braucht, benutzt einfach die Kommentarfunktion ganz unten oder schreibt mir einfach: info@enjinia.de

Schauen wir uns als erstes ein Bild vom offiziellen Cosplay-Guide an:

Our Wrench Cosplay Reference Guide is available NOW! >> https://t.co/kuEzHc8FQ8 #WatchDogs2 pic.twitter.com/dNcVdUfn4d

— Watch Dogs (@watchdogsgame) July 12, 2016

Schaut euch nur diese Displays an! Allein die Auflösung und die Pixeldichte. LED-Brillen gibt es schon lange und wurden schon von vielen Leuten gebaut, allerdings mit LED-Matrizen mit deutlich niedriger Auflösung, z.B. 8-mal-8 Pixel oder so. So eine Lösung wäre ganz okay… irgendwie, aber ich hab mir gedacht, dass das ganze für Skunk & Weasel deutlich besser sein muss. Irgendwas, was irgendwie ‚okay‘ wäre, wäre nicht gut genug.

Falls ihr das selbst nachbauen wollt, dann sage ich euch gleich, dass ich ein paar ziemlich fiese Dinge mit einigen Adafruit-Produkten gemacht habe. Diese Hacks können die Komponenten beschädigen oder sogar zerstören, selbst wenn sie korrekt durchgeführt wurden und ihr könntet sogar den/die USB-Port(s) eures PCs kaputt machen, falls ihr das hier nachmacht. Ich übernehme natürlich keine Haftung für eventuelle Schäden die durch das Nachahmen dieses Guides entstehen.
Weiterlesen auf eigene Gefahr.

Features:
16 x 16 pixels pro Auge
Externe Stromversorgung – sollte länger als 10 Stunden halten.
Fernbedienung für die Emotes – Kurz drücken und das entsprechende Emote leuchtet auf. Durch längeres Drücken wird das Emote permanent angezeigt, bis eine andere Taste gedrückt wird.
Einige Materialien die ich verwendet habe:

(Hinweis: Es handelt sich hierbei um Affiliate Links. Wenn ihr diese Links nutzt um etwas zu kaufen, dann bekomme ich winzigen Bruchteil davon ab, was euch allerdings nichts extra kostet. Für mich ergibt sich so aber die Möglichkeit meine Server- und Projektkosten zu decken.)

Adafruit 0.8″ 8×16 LED Matrix FeatherWing Display Kit – White
Anker Astro E1 5200mAh Mini Externer Akku Power Bank USB Ladegerät mit PowerIQ für iPhone 6s, 6, 6s Plus, Galaxy S6 S5 und weitere (Schwarz)
Aukru HC-05 Wireless-Bluetooth-Host Serial-Transceiver-Modul Slave und Master RS232 mit 6 set kabel für Arduino
Tinksky HC-06 Bluetooth RF-Transceiver-Modul drahtlose serielle 4 Pins für Arduino (zufällige Kabelfarbe)
Andux Zone Jagd Airsoft X400 Wind Staubschutz Tactical Schutzbrille-Motorrad Brille GL-04 (clear)
Nano V3.0 Modul mit ATmega328P, CH340G, 5V Board, 16MHz, Arduino kompatibel
Die Brille
Ich habe eine billige Schutzbrille besorgt und das Kunststoffvisier durch eine Lochplatte aus Aluminium ersetzt, hinter der man die LEDs verstecken kann. Wenn ihr euch eine Lochplatte kauft, dann kauft eine mit deutlich größeren Löchern. Es sollte eher ein Gitter sein, als ein Blech, damit so wenige Licht wie möglich verloren geht. Bei dieser hier waren die Löcher zu klein und ich musste einen Haufen Löcher per Hand aufbohren und dabei die ganze Zeit beten, dass nichts kaputt geht.

The housing is actually very flexible, almost like hard rubber

Thickness: 0,8 mm, holes 2 mm, spaced 3,5 mm apart (center to center). The holes where widened to 2,8 mm later on

Das Visier lässt sich sehr einfach herausdrücken und wurde von mir als Schablone benutzt, um das Lochblech auszuschneiden.

Wrench Cosplay cutting the visor

Zum ausschneiden habe ich eine Flex benutzt, irgendein anderes Handschleifgerät tut es wahrscheinlich auch. Ich bevorzuge Trennschleifen, weil es schnell geht und die Kanten sehr sauber werden, ohne dass man jede menge Werkzeugspuren sieht. Man muss nur den Grat wegfeilen und alles sieht super aus.

Wrench Cosplay finish

Wie bereits gesagt, musste ich die Löcher per Hand aufbohren, was besser funktioniert hat als ich dachte. Anfangs waren die Löcher 2 mm im Durchmesser, die 3,5 mm voneinander entfernt sind (von Lochmitte zu Lochmitte), die ich auf 2,8 mm aufgebohrt habe. Solltet ihr das auch machen müssen, dann würde ich empfehlen die Ränder nicht aufzubohren. Niemand merkt den Unterschied und es wahrscheinlich besser, wenn die Ränder steifer bleiben. In jedem Fall entstehen beim Bohren ein hässlicher Grat bei jedem Loch, der entfernt werden muss. Denkt daran: Das ist Teil einer Maske und wird über die Augen getragen, Ihr wollt AUF KEINEN FALL später Metallspäne im Auge haben. Seit sorgfältig!

Egal ob man aufbohren muss oder nicht, das ganze muss mit Sandpapier bearbeitet werden, weil wir das Blech schwarz anmalen müssen.

Wrench Cosplay Visor drilled

Sieht nicht schlecht aus, oder? Ich habe einfach schwarze Acrylfarbe aus dem Baumarkt aufgepinselt, aber anmalen ist nicht wirklich meine Stärke. Die Profis unter euch erreichen mit Sprühfarbe, Airbrush oder irgendwas, an das ich nicht mal gedacht habe, vielleicht bessere Ergebnisse. Ich habe mit dem Gedanken gespielt das Blech von nem Kumpel eloxieren zu lassen, aber dafür war die Zeit zu knapp und ich hatte Bedenken, dass der Prozess die feinen Strukturen kaputt machen könnte.

Wrench Cosplay goggles painted

Elektronik:
Enter the (LED) MATRIX
Nach einigen Googlesuchen erscheint die LED-Matrix KWM-20882XWB-Y als der beste Kandidat und hat die höchste verfügbare Auflösung, bei der ein 8×8 Pixel-Array in ein winziges 2 x 2 cm Quadrat gequetscht wurden. Außerdem sind es weiße LEDs! Es ist gar nicht so einfach weiße LED-Matrizen zu finden…. Nachdem ich einige maßstabsgetreue Quadrate aus Pappe ausgeschnitten und rumprobiert habe, erschienen 4 Matrizen pro Auge als die Menge, die in die Maske passen und genug Auflösung bieten. Das wäre ganze 16 x 16 Pixel pro Auge! Die meisten LED-Brillen haben nur 8 x 8 Pixel.

Wrench Cosplay KWM-20882XWB-Y LED Matrix

Zum Glück gibt es diese LEDs als Module von Adafruit, inklusive eines Controllers (HT16K33). Damit kann man bis zu 2 Matrizen ansteuern und die Strombegrenzung und das Multiplexing wird auch automatisch übernommen. Das nimmt uns eine Menge Arbeit bei der Steuerung dieser Unmengen an LEDs ab. Das ist nicht einfach nur Faulheit, sondern macht die Lösung deutlich robuster und reduziert die Möglichkeiten für Fehler. Da dieser Guide für Laien gedacht ist, werde ich mich mit Details zu der Elektronik zurückhalten aber es sollten immer noch genug Infos da sein für einen Nachbau. Ein detaillierter Artikel über die Elektronik und die Software folgt, falls das Interesse hoch ist.

Wrench Cosplay Adafruit 8×16 LED Matrix FeatherWing

Für unsere Zwecke sind die Module etwas zu breit und lassen aneinandergelegt eine viel zu breite Spalte. Wie man an den Bildern bereits abschätzen kann, habe ich das ganze gelöst, in dem ich das überstehende Material weg gefeilt habe. Die Meisten Lötpunkte an beiden Seiten sind sowieso nicht angeschlossen und sind ohne Funktion.

Wrench Cosplay two Adafruit 8×16 LED Matrix FeatherWing gap

Also habe ich die Kanten der Platinen abgefeilt, bis nichts mehr über die LEDs hervorsteht und alles bündig ist.

Wrench Cosplay Adafruit 8×16 LED Matrix FeatherWing filing

Oho! Keine Lücke mehr!

Wrench Cosplay Adafruit 8×16 LED Matrix FeatherWing no gap

Wie bereits gesagt sind die meisten Pins an den Modulen ohne Funktion und man kann sie gefahrlos zusammenlöten damit die Boards stabiler werden. Diese ‚Doppelmodule‘ müssen noch verkabelt werden, damit sie richtig funktionieren. Dabei sind die Verbindungen so einzulöten, wie auf dem Foto gezeigt. Die oberen 2 Verbindungen müssen unbedingt so gelötet werden wie gezeigt, am unteren Ende der beiden Widerstände (das sind die schwarzen Kästchen, auf denen 1002 steht). Die Verkabelung oben ist für die I2C Leitungen, damit werden die Befehle an die Boards gesendet, und die unteren sind die Spannungsversorgung. Rot sind 5V, Grün ist Masse (GND), Beige ist SDA und Türkis ist SCL. Ihr müsst nicht verstehen, was die letzteren beiden Dinge bedeuten, ihr müsst aber für später wissen, welches Kabel welches ist, wenn es an das Anschließen an den Arduino geht.

Randnotiz: Ich habe die Displays an 5V angeschlossen, obwohl die Module dafür ausgelegt sind um mit den 3,3 V des Feather Boards zu arbeiten. Soweit ich das sehe, sind die Controller-Chips so oder so für 5V ausgelegt und scheinen die Strombegrenzung der LEDs automatisch zu übernehmen. Ich kann allerdings im Datenblatt nichts genaueres über die Strombegrenzung lesen, aber es funktioniert tadellos also Frage ich einfach nicht weiter.

Wrench Cosplay two Adafruit 8×16 LED Matrix FeatherWing solderd together solder markings corrected

Das Ergebnis sollte ungefähr so aussehen wie hier, abzüglich des Alustreifens. Der kommt später. Man muss auch beide ‚Augen‘ miteinander verbinden. Einfach die jeweiligen Leitungen miteinander verbinden, SCL an SCL, SDA an SDA, 5V an 5V und so weiter und alles funktioniert. Man könnte alles schon an einen Arduino anschließen und damit rumspielen (öhm…ich meinte natürlich testen…).

Wrench Cosplay two Adafruit 8×16 LED Matrix FeatherWing I2C soldered

Durch Zufall überlappen sich die Löcher der ‚Doppelmodule‘ perfekt mit dem Lochblech. Daher habe ich mit einem Nibbler (einer speziellen Blechschere) einen Streifen aus dem Lochblech ausgeschnitten. Manchmal ist der wichtigste Teil eines Projektes, ein bisschen Glück zu haben. Der Streifen wurde dann in Form gebogen und die Module angeschraubt, mit M2 Schrauben, die auf Länge gesägt und gefeilt wurden. Schaut schon viel mehr nach Gläsern aus!

Ich habe einen Arduino Nano verwendet um beide Displays anzusteuern. Man kann natürlich auch einen Arduino Pro Mini oder etwas ähnliches nehmen und es wäre wahrscheinlich auch viel kleiner aber ich wollte, dass das ganze auch unterwegs umprogrammiert werden kann, durch einen Laien. Falls etwas schief geht, kann jemand einfach die Brille in einen Computer einstöpseln und ich kann dann aus der Ferne die Firmware ändern oder neu aufspielen. Mit dem Pro Mini bräuchte man ein gesondertes Programmiergerät und ich müsste einem Laien, wahrscheinlich per Telefon, erklären wie man alles anschließt, vorausgesetzt das Anbringen des Programmiergerätes ist am endgültigen Kostüm noch möglich. Wahrscheinlich passiert das ganze auch noch in einer Situation, in der das ganze in den nächsten 5 Minuten funktionieren muss. Warum also ein Risiko eingehen?

Jedenfalls habe ich den Arduino an das Display angeschlossen. Masse wurde an Masse, 5V an Vin angeschlossen und natürlich SDA an A4 und SCL an A5. Hinweis: Vin ist nur deswegen 5V, weil eine 5V Spannungsversorgung benutzt wird. Wir umgehen so den Spannungsregler des Arduinos und entlasten ihn. Die Pinbelegung ist nur für den Arduino Nano gültig, solltet ihr ein anderes Board verwenden, dann müsst ihr euch die jeweilige Pinbelegung anschauen. Ich habe von dem ganzen kein Foto mehr, aber auf diesem Bild vom Systemcheck kann man in etwa sehen, wie das ganze aussah. In diesem Zustand habe ich auch die Software enwickelt.

Wrench Cosplay System test

Nachdem ich gecheckt habe, dass alles funktioniert, habe ich das Display in der Mitte und an den Rändern mit Heißkleber an die Brille geklebt. Es sitzt eigentlich schon sehr eng, daher wollte ich nicht alles mit jeder Menge Heißkleber versauen. Möglicherweise muss alles später nochmal herausgenommen werden und eine Menge Heißkleber wäre da nur hinderlich.

Wrench Cosplay hot glued

Die Bluetooth-Module
Das Anschließen des HC-05 an das HC-06-Modul ist ein wenig komplexer, wenn man noch nie mit einem Arduino gearbeitet hat und bisher habe ich keinen anfängerfreundlichen Guide dafür schreiben können. Bitte schaut hier für mehr Details: https://www.martyncurrey.com/connecting-2-arduinos-by-bluetooth-using-a-hc-05-and-a-hc-06-pair-bind-and-link/

Ich werde diesen Beitrag mit zusätzlichen Informationen aktualisieren, sobald ich dazu komme.

Die Fernbedienung
Wrench Cosplay remote test
As you can see, the buttons are different sizes, because they come from different batches/manufacturers. The technical reason for this is, that I am a moron and I suck at keeping inventory.

Die LED-Gläser werden über Bluetooth ferngesteuert. Man könnte auch handelsübliche Tastenfelder verwenden, aber es gibt keine, die mehr als 16 Tasten haben (ohne dabei deutlich mehr als 16 Tasten zu haben) und wir wollen(?) alle 17 Emotes des offziellen Cosplay Guides realisieren. Daher habe ich meine eigene Gelötet, die im Nachhinein noch kleiner war. Ursprünglich sollte die Fernbedienung in dem Stachelarmband untergebracht werden, aber ich habe schnell gesehen, dass alles zu groß wird und langsam anfing so auszusehen:

ZYPAD wrist wearable computer from Arcom Control Systems
I think the wristband remote could still be done, if I could come up with a clever button scheme, in order to reduce buttons and save space.

Also, eine einfach Fernbedienung. Ich habe kleine Taster in einem Gitter auf einer Lochrasterplatine angeordnet, mit 4 Reihen und 5 Zeilen, die letzte Zeile hat nur einen einzigen Knopf. Leider habe ich kein klareres Bild von der Schaltung, ich stelle hier später eins rein, wenn ich die Zeit finde.

Wrench Cosplay Keypad matrix

Die 5 Zeilen sind an die Pins 2,3,4,5 und 6 eines anderen Arduino Nanos angeschlossen und die Reichen and 7,8,9 und 10. Der Knopf mit der Nummer ‚1‘ sollte an die Zeile 2 und die Reihe 10 angeschlossen werden. Falls es einem egal ist, welcher Button welches Emote auslöst, dann spielt das aber keine Rolle. Schließlich wird das HC-05 Modul verwendet um die Fernbedienung an die Brille anzuschließen. Einfach TX and Pin 11 und RX an Pin 12 anschließen und alles ist bereit. Ich habe alle Teile der Fernbedienung auf Lochraster gelötet und einen USB-Stecker angebracht, damit die Fernbedienung durch eine Powerbank mit Strom versorgt werden kann. Ich habe eine weitere Anker Astro E1 5200mAh Powerbank benutzt, was totaler Overkill ist, aber so gibt es eine Ersatzbatterie für die Brille. Die Powerbank habe ich mit doppelseitigen Klettverschlüssen an die Fernbedienung angebracht.

The 5 row are connected to pin 2,3,4,5 and 6 of another Arduino Nano and the columns to 7,8,9 and 10. The button number ‚1‘ should be connected to row 2 and column 10. If you don’t care which button is which, then this doesn’t matter. Finally, the HC-05 Serial to Bluetooth module is used to connect to the goggles. Just wire TX to pin 11 and RX to Pin 12 and you are good to go. I soldered everything onto the perf board and gave it a USB plug, so that the remote could be powered by a powerbank. I used another Anker Astro E1 5200mAh, which is totally overpowered, but this way there is an emergency spare for the goggles. The powerbank is attached to the remote with a strip of double sided velcro.

Software:
Ihr könnt die Software für die Brille und die Fernbedienung hier finden:

https://github.com/madgyver/Wrench-Cosplay-Remote
https://github.com/madgyver/Wrench-Cosplay-Goggles
Wenn ihr schon einmal in C oder C++ programmier habt, werdet ihr schnell sehen, dass ich nur einige Beispielprojekte modifiziert habe und dass der Code ziemlich trivial ist. Ich habe mich dazu entschieden einfachen Code zu schreiben, der leicht zu lesen ist, statt einer eleganten Lösung, die nur von Programmieren verändert werden kann.

Das wars im Grunde auch schon. Ich hoffe, dass der Guide euch gefallen hat und dass Ihr die Möglichkeit habt, das Cosplay am Ubisoft-Stand auf der Gamescom 2016 life zu sehen. Falls noch Fragen offen sind, einfach die Kommentarfunktion nutzen oder mir unter info@enjinia.de eine Mail schreiben.[:]

Bingewatch

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.